', God knows the end from the beginning. References: Luke 13:7, Luke 13:8.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. Behold. Luke 13:7 What Does Luke 13:7 Mean? The cultivator of the vineyard. Then the tree becomes abundantly fruitful." The Codex Bezae has added here, φερε την αξινην, Bring the axe and cut it down. Although God ordered Him to cut down the unproductive tree, Jesus interceded on Israel's behalf, and one more year was granted for Him to try to get the tree to bear fruit - to get the nation to bring forth the fruit of righteousness. 10 And they that were sent, returning to the house, found the servant whole that had been sick. - Or, in other words, Why should the ground be also useless? 13:7-9 Here is a prophecy of the sufferings of Christ. The supposed allusion to the duration of our Lord's ministry is precarious. American King James Version ×). He does not blame victims. Luke 13:7. takes this form: first, has all the digging and culture and money spent and time been honestly used? The parable of the fruitless fig tree was a vivid picture of apostate Israel, who refused to repent of their sin. The vinedresser (τον αμπελουργον — ton ampelourgon). Why cumbereth it the ground? Rather, “cut it out ” ( ἐκ ) from among the other trees and the vines. 35. Knowing that the vineyard's owner had every reason to be disappointed with the barren tree, the keeper intercedes for the tree's life, asking for another year. The texts add aph" hou = from which, or since (three years). Luke 13:6-9 Another Year of Grace. Every man is allowed a certain time of trial, during which he enjoys the means and helps necessary to holiness. The Lord of life has taken a fruit tree in a garden as the best example of the nature of life, both here and in the one great judgment type, when He cursed the barren fig tree, and withered it root and branch, to be for ever the emblem of the lost nation. One word in Greek. Behold, these three years I come, &c.] There was no tree that was of a kind to bear • Luke … The A. V. omits the very important καὶ , also (Rev. Why also, besides bearing no fruit, cumbereth it the ground? Luke 13:11 And, behold, there was a woman which had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and was bowed together, and could in no wise lift up herself. Thank You that in Christ I have all I need for life and godliness and help me to walk in spirit and truth all the days of my life, for Your greater praise and glory - this I ask in Jesus' name, AMEN. God will lay down his basket and take up his axe. Luke 13:7. τρία, three) A number in some measure decisive and determinate. Christ and the Father are one. time.". Demai, c. 1. sect. Though this parable was originally meant of the Jews, it may be applied to men in every age; for it … Luke 13:6-9 [6] Then he told this parable: "A man had a fig tree, planted in his vineyard, and he went to look for fruit on it, but did not find any. Hieros. Is there more than one way this can be understood to mean the keeper of the vineyard to be a sole pastor? as of one who has a right to complain.— , three years, reckoned not from the planting of the tree (it is three years after planting that it begins to bear fruit), but from the time that it might have been expected in ordinary course to yield a crop of figs. Some think Christ here refers to the three years of his public ministry, which he had now gone through among the Jews with little success; but he seems rather to allude to the nature of fig trees, which, if fruitful, bear in three years time; for even בנות שוח, "a sort of white figs", which are the longest before they bring forth fruit to perfection, yet their fruit is ripe in three years time. 650; Ibid., vol. The owner immediately strikes it thrice with the back of his axe; but the other preventing him says, I beseech thee to spare it, and I will be answerable for its fertility. ', To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use the convenient, Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology, Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament, Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary, International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Then said he unto the dresser of the vineyard, behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none, And he said unto the vinedresser, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down, Why, besides bearing no fruit, is it impoverishing the soil. Likewise, a failure to repent and live for God will show a lack of fruit, equally evident. Luke 13:7. , the vine-dresser ( , ) here only in N.T.— , lo! Cumbereth expresses the meaning in a very general and comprehensive way. 7 Then said he unto the dresser of his vineyard, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground? If so the nation was allowed to survive near forty years after the voice of the intercessor had surrendered and ceased on earth. Where is the ceaseless inward power that transmutes all that reaches it into luxuriant growths of new and pleasant services, the silent sustained mastery that, come good, come evil, takes it all, and changes it into crop after crop in due season of help for others, life by which others may live? But planted by a Master's hand it stays there, drawing from common earth and common air a growth and a beauty new and unknown to them by its own transforming power; and so it goes on, never losing a moment, making all things serve it in turn, be it rain or frost or wind or sun. Thank You that You have postponed Your righteous judgement on Your nation Israel, and brought so many men and women into the kingdom of Your dear Son over the past two thousand years. Luke 13:7 : Luke 13:9 >> Luke 13:8. See the Preface to this Gospel. 1. ; and this may be the reason why this number is fixed upon; for if such fig trees do not bring forth ripe fruit in three years time, there is little reason to expect any from them: and thus it was time after time with the Jewish nation; and so it is with carnal professors: hence it follows. 4. seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground? 6-9 This parable of the barren fig-tree is intended to enforce the warning given just before: the barren tree, except it brings forth fruit, will be cut down. II. 3.The coming of the owner for fruit, the desire of God that they should produce good works. Why cumbereth it the ground? 7. Verses 13:7-9: Zechariah turned from the false prophets wounded in “friends” houses to the true prophet wounded in the house of His friends, Israel. The outer world comes to it in forces of all kinds, and it receives them all, draws them into its being, subdues them to itself, lives by and through them, but makes no stir itself; neither moves nor utters sound, nor is violent, nor fills the world with the rush of impetuous strength. for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. en. See the note on the above text. This is applied by some to represent the period of the Lord’s ministry. 7. 13 Now there were some present at that time who told Jesus about the Galileans … But if not, after that you can cut it down" (Luke 13:8-9 Luke 13:8-9 [8] And he answering said to him, Lord, let it alone this year also, till I shall dig about it, and dung it: [9] And if it bear fruit, well: and if not, then after that you shall cut it down. 1:—, And he said to the vineyard-keeper, ‘Behold, for three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree without finding any. Introduction - When we genuinely repent and begin living for God, fruit will be born in our lives that will soon be evident to all that pass by. Can refer only to the period of the Lord"s ministry. Pride in their Jewish heritage caused them to be haughty instead of humble. See Bishop Pearce. Luke 13:7-9 King James Version (KJV). “And he said to the vinedresser, Behold, these three years I have come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and have found none. Many of Christ’s parables painted a picture Israel’s disobedience; their hardness of heart and the rejection of their Messiah. It surfaced while I was posting some of my responses to his interview with Dr. Michael Brown. Luke 13:10 And he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. Jarchi, Maimon. Cut it down! Cut it down. Luk 13:9 And if it bears fruit, well; and if not, then after that you shall cut it down. To those who believed in Him the picture of the fruitless fig tree is obvious but to the unbelieving heart it appears obscure and puzzling. CHAPTER 5. I. The first temptation was in the area of food and hunger. cumbereth it the ground = injureth it the soil also. The Lord was beginning His third year of teaching, as the true harmony of the Evangelists shows.— ἔρχομαι, I come) An abbreviated expression, as in ch. xi., No. Has it ornamented you, and budded into a growth of leaves fair to look on? Where would you place it on a scale of 1 – 10? Twenty-five times in the Epistles in the sense of vitiate. A barren fig tree renders the land useless by occupying valuable space. Israel wanted their Messiah to be a conquering hero, who would save them from their Roman overlords, not a saviour who demanded them to repent of their sin. Answer: Jesus told the Parable of the Fig Tree—Luke 13:6-9—immediately after reminding His listeners of a tower over the pool of Siloam (John 9:7) which unexpectedly fell and killed eighteen people. Commentary on Luke 13:6-9 (Read Luke 13:6-9) This parable of the barren fig-tree is intended to enforce the warning given just before: the barren tree, except it brings forth fruit, will be cut down. 8 And he answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this year also, till I shall dig about it, and dung it: 9 And if it bear fruit, well: and if not, then after that thou shalt cut it down. Behold these three years - From this circumstance in the parable, it may be reasonably concluded that Jesus had been, at the time of saying this, exercising his ministry for three years past; and, from what is said in Luke 13:8, of letting it alone this year also, it may be concluded likewise that this parable was spoken about a year before Christ's crucifixion; and, if both these conclusions are reasonable, we may thence infer that this parable was not spoken at the time which appears to be assigned to it, and that the whole time of Christ's public ministry was about four years. ‘Three years are the time of a full trial, at the end of which the inference of incurable sterility may be drawn.’ (Godet) Some refer this to the three years of our Lord’s ministry, now so nearly ended. "And he said to the vineyard-keeper, 'Behold, for three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree without finding any. Why does it even use up the ground? See on barren and unfruitful, 2 Peter 1:8. And. It concerns the interpretation of Zechariah 13:7-9: “Awake, O sword, against My Shepherd, And against the man, My Associate,” Declares the Lord of hosts. Maybe you would give 2006 an 8 or 9 out of 10 – in other words, it was a really good year. It was spoken to illustrate the dealings of God with them, and their own wickedness under all his kindness, and we may understand the different parts of the parable as designed to represent: 1.God, by the man who owned the vineyard. 11 And, behold, there was a woman which had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and was bowed together, and could in no wise lift up herself. 7 Then said he unto the dresser of his vineyard, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground? "Bean straw (manure of that material), scattered about the roots of the tree, will make it fruitful." In Luke’s narrative, two scenes of Jesus’ teaching sandwiches this account of healing and controversy with religious leaders. The owner's waiting signifies the delay of vengeance, to give Israel an opportunity to repent. Why, besides bearing no fruit, is it impoverishing the soil [rendering the neighbouring ground useless]? Our fruitfulness, our barrenness, our production of the wild poison fruit, all take place beneath his watchful but patient eye. In this part Luke places most of the information on the life and teaching of Jesus (Lk 1:1-4). And walking in the fear of the Lord and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit, it multiplied. Jesus is characterised as the vine-dresser who sought in vain for fruit, during the three years of His earthly ministry, but found none. But when it still proved to be fruitless he called on the vinedresser to cut it down and prevent it from filling up useful space where another tree could be planted and from taking the nutrients out of the ground to no purpose. The verb cumbereth ( καταργεῖ ) means to make of no effect. The master comes not merely once a year, but again and again within the year, at the seasons when fruit may be found on a fig tree (Hahn). dresser of vineyard. There is a certain indignation in this language. [7] So he said to the man who took care of the vineyard, `For three years now I've been coming to look for fruit on this fig tree and haven't found any. 'If it bear but the fourth part of a cab.' from among the vines. cut it down = cut it out: i.e. on. Cf. But the time is uncertain (see above). There may be no fruit; there may be leaves; there may be the leafless branch; in either case he departs in sorrowful disappointment. It is commonly rendered by “bring to nought,” or some like phrase. What kind of a year has 2006 been for you? So barren professors, as were the Jews, are not only useless and unprofitable themselves, being fruitless, but make churches barren, and stand in the way of others, who are stumbled by them; they are grieving to God, to Christ, and to the blessed Spirit, and are troublesome and burdensome to churches, ministers, and true believers: and the cutting them down may regard the judgment of God upon the nation of the Jews, which Christ would not have his apostles and ministers interpose for the averting of; or the excommunication of such worthless and hurtful professors out of the churches by them. This parable in the first place refers to the nation and people of the Jews. These trees bear fruit once in three years; they bear fruit indeed every year, but their fruit does not come to maturity till after three yearsF9T. Occurs only here. If he continues ignorant of God's visitation, despises the riches of the divine mercy, and goes on obstinately in sin, these advantages are frequently taken away from him, his day of grace ends; the utmost term of God's patience is past for ever; the divine spirit being grieved, is provoked to depart, and the man is delivered over to a hardened heart. Then, seem to be appeased, and so spare the tree, and afterwards it will yield fruit in abundance. Seeking fruit—The master seeks, and seeks from season to season. Old word, but here only in the N.T., from αμπελος — ampelos vine, and εργον — ergon work. Those who believed, received power to become children of God. Vine-dresser. Heavenly Father, thank You for giving me an understanding of Your word and help me learn even more from parables like the fruitless fig tree. Greek. The moment the life does not master the forces which come, that moment it begins to lose its own vitality, and therefore silent mastery of an outward world is life. The great question, "Are you fit to live?" 9 And if it bear fruit, well: and if not, then after that thou shalt cut it down. The objection to this, that the cutting down ought then to have taken place at the end of τοῦτο τὸ ἔτος, does not apply; for all is left indefinite in the request and the implied answer. Let it alone, I beseech thee, says the other, and this year it will bring forth fruit. & Bartenora in Misn. saith, 'Cut not down the palm that bears a cab of dates.' a 4 * Blessed are they who mourn, b. for they will be comforted. Barrenness curses others also. 23 “Parade, The Dallas Morning News, Sunday, April 10, 1988, p.4. E. Thring, Church of England Pulpit, April 3rd, 1880. The Sermon on the Mount. I have occasionally had a friend come by with a new car, hoping I would find out “how fast it would go.” For me, that is a real temptation. Answer: In Luke 13:6-9 Jesus spoke this parable: 'A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard, and he came seeking fruit on it and found none. 3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit, *. The visits of God are secret and unrecognized, though they be ever recurring. cumbereth. But it may mean only several years; a certain number being put for an uncertain. But this we do know.. that God in His mercy has continued to pour out 2000 years of grace upon grace since that day - on a world that deserves His righteous punishment. x., p. 773; edit. It appears that the owner had given it three years in order to see if its fruitless condition was permanent.